The past and future of malaria: A Q&A with Sonia Shah

Next week, I am presenting on malaria during an upcoming training for newly arrived Peace Corps volunteers. I’ll be showing Ms. Shah’s Ted Talk from 2013 where she discussed the reasons that malaria is still allowed to thrive. While Ms. Shah brings up very valid points about the current nature of the parasite and the cultural response (especially in regards to Mozambique), the solutions, of which we are in desperate need, are lacking. Still interesting to get the conversation started about malaria and the need to eradicate this disease.

TED Blog

Sonia Shah shares a surprising reason why we still haven't ended malaria at TEDGlobal 2013 — that people in malarial countries have accepted it as an unfortunate fact of life. Photo: James Duncan Davidson At TEDGlobal 2013, Sonia Shah shares a surprising reason why we still haven’t ended malaria — that people in areas where it still exists have accepted it as a normal part of life. Photo: James Duncan Davidson

Hundreds of thousands of people die from malaria every year. So why is it still around? In today’s talk, journalist Sonia Shah takes a look at the history of malaria and outlines some of the major challenges facing the end of one of the world’s deadliest diseases. [ted_talkteaser id=1819]It’s not simply that we need to improve our science, says Shah; we also face economic, cultural and political obstacles. One fascinating barrier: that people who live in the areas where malaria is a problem view the disease as a normal, though unfortunate, part of life — much like people in the developed world view the flu. Because they see it as a fact…

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